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Pictures and history of a family that photographed the early years

In 1903, at the height of the Northern gold rush, the Lomen family of Minnesota relocated to Nome, Alaska. Rather than pan for gold, they sought other commercial opportunities in the booming Alaskan economy.

lots more at Mashable:Pictures and history of a family that photographed the early years

Artivist Jil Love Tackles Chemtrails, Vaccines and Animal Rights

jil_love_revolution

By Brandon Turbeville

Jil Love did not invent the concept of artivism but she is re-inventing it in a number of ways. For those who may be unaware, artivism is a unique brand of art that combines activism and art (art + activism equals artivism).

Many artists have used graffiti, stencils, street art, spoken word and other more traditional forms of combining the two. However, Love is not only combining aesthetics and protest, she’s adding an element of performance that brings the art to the audience rather than requiring the audience to find the art.

Tackling such issues as the genocide of Palestinians, animal rights, bull fighting, vaccines and even chemtrails, Love’s work is thought-provoking and often controversial to say the least.

Over the last three years, Love has strived to create a social movement and out of that desire she launched her project Jil Love Revolution which has garnered attention worldwide.

Having caught the attention of the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, Nation of Change and True Activist, Love has brought her perspective and her method of artistic passive resistance to thousands across the world.

Love has been outspoken against animal cruelty and for animal rights in general. A native of Spain, Love has also used her art to speak out against bullfighting; a shameful Spanish practice of enraging, torturing and subsequently killing a bull for the entertainment of spectators.

Stop Bullfighting

Jilloverevolution.com, Photo credit: Yolanda Ylalonso

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Jilloverevolution.com, Photo credit: Evel Gonzalez.

In 2014 Love stated:

I’m here to speak against this cruel and savage Spanish old tradition of the torture, sacrifice and killing of innocent bulls and their babies as an amusement event in the Spanish culture. We are in 2014 and Spain can not be considered a modern European country with this kind of tradition which are more a part of an old and dark age.

Love has protested bullfighting on a number of occasions but perhaps one of the most effective and visual was when she took her art to the streets of Madrid. Lying on the street covered in fake blood, Love, completely nude, drew the attention of onlookers to her signs that read: “Murdered by bullfighters in Spain” and “Do you think this image is outrageous? Spain is different.”

Love recalls a famous Gandhi quote when she says, “the greatness of a nation will be judged by the way its animals are treated.”

read more :Artivist Jil Love Tackles Chemtrails, Vaccines and Animal Rights

 

 

 

 

 

Scientists puzzled by slowing of Atlantic conveyor belt, warn of abrupt climate change

27th May 2016 / Mike Gaworecki

Scientists are increasingly warning of the potential that a shutdown, or even significant slowdown, of the Atlantic conveyor belt could lead to abrupt climate change, a shift in Earth’s climate that can occur within as short a timeframe as a decade but persist for decades or centuries.

  • Limited ocean measurements have shown that “the Atlantic conveyor belt” is far more capricious than models have previously suggested.
  • From 2009 to 2010, the average strength of key ocean currents in the North Atlantic dropped by about 30 percent, causing warmer waters to remain in the tropics rather than being carried northward.
  • “The consequences included an unusually harsh European winter, a strong Atlantic Basin hurricane season, and — because a strong AMOC keeps water away from land — an extreme sea level rise of nearly 13 centimeters along the North American coast north of New York City,” according to Eric Hand, author of a Science article published this month.

Scientists in the Labrador Sea recently made the first retrieval of data from one of 53 lines moored to the sea floor and studded with instruments that have been monitoring the ocean’s circulatory system since 2014.

Held taut by submerged buoys, these moorings are arrayed from Labrador to Greenland and Scotland. In total, five research cruises are planned for this spring and summer to fetch the data the moorings are busy collecting.

The instrument array, known as the Overturning in the Subpolar North Atlantic Program (OSNAP), measures salinity, temperature, and current velocity of the surrounding water, data that is vital to understanding a set of powerful currents with far-reaching effects on the global climate. These currents are known as the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) — or, more popularly, “the Atlantic conveyor belt” — and they have “mysteriously” slowed down over the past decade, according to Eric Hand, author of a Science article published this month.

Scientists are increasingly warning of the potential that a shutdown, or even significant slowdown, of the Atlantic conveyor belt could lead to abrupt climate change, a shift in Earth’s climate that can occur within as short a timeframe as a decade but persist for decades or centuries.

North Atlantic waters, such as the Greenland, Irminger, and Labrador Seas, are especially salty when compared with water in other parts of the world’s oceans. When AMOC currents, like the Gulf Stream, bring warmer waters from the south to the North Atlantic, the water cools down, releases its heat to the atmosphere, becomes colder, and sinks, since saltier water is denser than fresher water and cold water is denser than warm water.

In a process called “thermohaline circulation” (“thermos” is the Greek word for heat, while “halos” is the word for salt), this cold, salty water then slowly flows back down into the South Atlantic and eventually makes its way throughout the world’s oceans. At the same time, warm, salty tropical surface waters are drawn northward, where they replace the sinking cold water.

1024px-Thermohaline_Circulation_2
This map shows the pattern of thermohaline circulation also known as “meridional overturning circulation”. This collection of currents is responsible for the large-scale exchange of water masses in the ocean, including providing oxygen to the deep ocean. The entire circulation pattern takes ~2000 years. Image via Wikimedia Commons.

In other words, the dynamic at play in the North Atlantic seas are an important driver of the ocean’s circulation system, which is why the region was selected for the OSNAP instrument array. Two other arrays that have been deployed in different waters have already produced some strange results that scientists are eager to learn more about.

“Models suggest that climate change should weaken the AMOC as warmer Arctic temperatures, combined with buoyant freshwater from Greenland’s melting ice cap, impede the formation of deep currents,” Hand wrote in the Science article. “But so far, limited ocean measurements show the AMOC to be far more capricious than the models have been able to capture.”

An array deployed in 2004 between Florida and the Canary Islands, for instance, showed “unexpectedly wild swings” in the strength of the AMOC currents from month to month, Hand reported. From 2009 to 2010, the average strength of the AMOC dropped by about 30 percent, causing warmer waters to remain in the tropics rather than being carried northward.

“The consequences included an unusually harsh European winter, a strong Atlantic Basin hurricane season, and — because a strong AMOC keeps water away from land — an extreme sea level rise of nearly 13 centimeters along the North American coast north of New York City,” Hand said.

Over its first decade of operation, the Florida-to-Canary Islands subtropical array recorded a 25 percent decline in the AMOC’s average strength, which is an order of magnitude more than models suggested could occur due to the effects of climate change.

Meric Srokosz, an oceanographer at the UK’s University of Southampton and the science coordinator for the U.K.-funded portion of the array, told Hand that scientists suspect some natural variation is to blame in the dropoff of the AMOC’s strength, including the 60- to 70-year cycle of varying sea temperatures called the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. Initial analysis of the latest, unpublished data from the array shows the AMOC’s average strength has leveled out, but is still well below where it started in 2004.

“It will take another decade of measurements to separate the climate change effect from natural variability,” Hand wrote.

Threat of abrupt climate change

Models have suggested that there is a threshold below which the AMOC could suddenly shut down altogether — “the doomsday scenario of a frozen Europe exploited in the 2004 disaster movie The Day After Tomorrow,” as Hand put it. “Many climate models suggest that the AMOC should be stable over the long term in a warming world, but plenty of evidence from the recent geological past confirms that the conveyor belt can slow down significantly.”

Full article at :Mongabay

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fingal’s Cave

Queen Victoria, Matthew Barney, Jules Verne, and Pink Floyd are not names you usually hear in the same sentence, but then the place that they all share is itself quite uncommon. Known as Fingal’s Cave, it bears a history and geology unlike any other cave in the world.

At 72 feet tall and 270 feet deep, what makes this sea cave so visually astoundingly is the hexagonal columns of basalt, shaped in neat six-sided pillars, that make up its interior walls.

The cave was a well-known wonder of the ancient Irish and Scottish Celtic people and was an important site in the legends. Known to the Celts as Uamh-Binn or “The Cave of Melody,” one Irish legend in particular explained the existence of the cave as well as that of the similar Giant’s Causeway in Ireland. As both are made of the same neat basalt columns, the legend holds that they were the end pieces of a bridge built by the Irish giant Fionn mac Cumhaill (a.k.a. Finn McCool), so he could make it to Scotland where he was to fight Benandonner, his gigantic rival.

The legend, which connects the two structures, is in effect geologically correct. Both the Giant’s Causeway and Fingal’s Cave were indeed created by the same ancient lava flow, which may have, at one time formed a “bridge” between the two sites. Of course, this happened some 60 million years ago, long before people would have been around to see it. Nonetheless, the deductive reasoning of the ancient peoples formed the connection and base of the legend that the two places must be related.

full story at : Atlas Obscura

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Bloody crazy”: River near fracking site bursts into flames in Australia (VIDEO)

This is for all the people that think fracking is a good idea.This is a video of a river being set on fire near a fracking site!

A Queensland river near a fracking site exploded into flames after a coal seam gas (CSP) protester sparked a kitchen lighter above the water surface.
Greens MP Jeremy Buckingham uploaded dramatic footage of the river ablaze to his website and social media accounts to highlight his party’s concerns about fracking and the extraction of coal seam gas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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