Huda Shaarawi (1879–1947) was an Egyptian feminist who influenced not only women in Egypt but throughout the Arab world. She was a pioneer in feminism, and brought to light the restrictive world of upper-class women in her book The Harem Years, published in 1987.

Huda Shaarawi (also spelled Hoda Shaarawi or Sha’arawi) was raised in the harem system, which kept women secluded and veiled. Very wealthy families would have separate buildings and eunuchs to guard the women and act as their messengers to the outer world. The word “harem” actually refers to the rooms in which the women stayed, separate from the men. All women, rich or poor, went outside veiled, except peasant women in the countryside. Veiling and the harem system were cultural traditions, and were followed by Jewish and Christian women as well as Muslim.

Huda was very well educated from a young age. She was tutored in a variety of subjects and spoke French, Turkish, and Arabic.

At the age of 13, Huda was married to her cousin Ali Pasha Shaarawi. In their marriage contract, he had promised to leave his slave-concubine, but she bore him a child a year after their marriage. Huda separated from him and they remained so for the next 7 years. During this time she was able to be independent, since her father had died when she was young. She extended her education and became involved in activism. As she grew older, her husband, a political activist himself, included her in his political meetings, and often sought her counsel.

Huda Shaarawi, left, with fellow feminist & organize Safia Zaghlul, right

Huda Shaarawi, left, with fellow feminist & organize Safia Zaghlul, right (courtesyWikimedia Commons)

Huda had a hand in many “firsts” for women in Egyptian society. In 1908, she founded the first philanthropic society run by Egyptian women, where they offered services for poor women and children. She believed that having women run such projects would challenge the view that women are created for men’s pleasure and in need of protection. In 1910, she opened a school for girls focused on academics, rather than teaching practical skills like midwifery which was common at the time.

full article over at:AWH all the kick-ass women history leaves out

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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